Farm Safety During the 2016 Harvest

Farm Safety During the 2016 Harvest

As we approach the 2016 corn and soybean harvest here in Benton County, it’s a great time for everyone driving the county roads to take a moment and reflect on farm safety. More farm accidents occur during the fall than any other time of the year and it’s everyone’s responsibility for safety.

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Bright & Reflective SMV Signs & Flashers should be easily visible on equipment such as this planter.

Slow Moving Vehicles

One big danger during harvest are the slow moving vehicle on county roads. As farmers move equipment from field to field or haul grain on highways and rural roads, be on the lookout for flashing lights and bright slow moving vehicle signs. As a public service announcement, pay extra attention when driving on rural roads during harvest season, especially before and after work or school. Farm vehicles are large and move much slower than cars, the best advice is to slow down, pay attention and stay off cell phones while driving.

Here are a few tips for our farming friends & the general public to help make harvest is a safe one:

  • Sunsets & sunrises can be blinding during the morning or evening commute in the fall. Please, pay attention and slow down at road crossings & intersections.
  • Farmers, please make sure that Slow Moving Vehicle (SMV) signs are clearly visible on all off-road vehicles. Make sure SMV signs are in good condition and properly mounted.
  • Use proper vehicle lighting & make sure your headlights and brake lights are functioning.
  • Tractors & combines should use flashers at all times while on public roads. The American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) recommends two flashing amber lights, mounted at least 42 inches high, in both the front and rear.
  • Turn on your headlights 30 minutes before sunset, until 30 minutes after sunrise. Also use headlights whenever insufficient light or unfavorable weather conditions exist. If your vehicle has automatic headlamps, check to make sure the switch is in the correct position.
  • When trailering or pulling wagons, inspect hitches to ensure they are sturdy and properly mounted before towing or heading down the road. If equipped, use the safety chains.
  • Be patient & share the road.

Benton County Sheriff Don Munson adds, “We need to remember that our local farmers are out there trying to do their job as safely as possible. Farm equipment is oversized and that means we need to exercise over-caution. Pay attention to your surroundings and be please patient.”

 

Women Farmland Owners Discussion

Free Conservation Discussion & Field Tour for Women Farmland Owners in Tippecanoe county & Surrounding Indiana County area

July 27th, 2016 and open discussion and field tour is available to any women farm and land owners at the Lilly Nature Center, located at 1620 Lindberg Road, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47906.

“We estimate that women now own or co-own between one-fourth and one-half of the farmland in the Midwest and they are very interested in farming practices that benefit the health of their land,” said Jennifer Filipiak, associate Midwest director for the American Farmland Trust. “Our goal is to connect these women with each other and with the resource professionals who can help them with their farmland management goals.”

Women Caring for the LandSM meetings bring together landowners in an informal learning format for a women-only morning discussion followed by a more in-depth look at the characteristics of healthy soil and farming practices that promote it. Female conservation professionals are on hand to answer questions and share resources.  A participant from last year’s learning circle commented that is it “wonderful to hear experts who were women sharing their information and passion.”

Following lunch, area conservationists will lead a bus tour to view conservation practices on the ground. Discussion will focus on soil health and cover crops, but will also include water quality, wildlife management and government cost-share programs.  The Women Caring for the LandSM format was developed by the Women Food and Agriculture Network (WFAN) in Iowa. “We continually hear from women how grateful they are for a women-only learning environment,” commented Bridget Holcomb, executive director of the WFAN, “and they tell us that they are able to discuss issues that they wouldn’t feel comfortable bringing up in any other setting.”

On July 27, coffee and registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the meeting will start at 9.  Lunch is provided, and the program will end with refreshments at 3 p.m.

RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Friday, July 22 to Chris Remley, Tippecanoe County Soil & Water Conservation District at (765) 474-9992, extension 3 or chris.remley@in.nacdnet.netIf you need accommodation please notify us when you RSVP.  And feel free to bring a female friend or family member, just let us know when you RSVP!

This session of Women Caring for the LandSM is sponsored by the Tippecanoe County Soil and Water Conservation District in collaboration with Women4theLand and the Women, Food and Agriculture Network. Staff from the SWCD, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and other conservationists will be on hand to answer your questions.

More information can be found at the Women Caring for the Land website here:  http://www.wfan.org/our-programs/women-caring-for-the-landsm/

Article Provided by Tippecanoe County FSA Office & the USDA

Tippecanoe County FSA Office

1812 Troxel DR, STE C2
Lafayette, IN 47909

Phone: 765-474-9992
Fax: 855-374-4071

County Executive Director:
Stacy Helbert

Farm Loan Manager:
Eric Peterson

Program Technicians:
Alyssa Holt
Holly Humphrey
Holly Walters

County Committee:
Debra Kerkhove
Michael Peabody
David Swank